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Sustaining Mood with our Sept Speaker: Scott Dalrymple

Sustaining Mood via Fantasy & Science Fiction

Scott pic outside (1)Join us for a stimulating afternoon
Sunday, Sept 13th, 2:00 pm at Unity Center

I enjoy stories that sustain a certain mood; fantasy and science fiction allow the exploration of some particularly interesting moods. I tend to craft and revise sentences until the sound, and the mood, are just right.  I often choose words simply because they have the right mouth-feel.  I care about the cadence of sentences, often down to the exact number of syllables.  It’s not at all scientific; it’s about what sounds right to me.  This technique can be used to create a humorous mood (see “An Open Letter to Earth,” which appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction), a creepy one (see “Enfant Terrible,” also in F&SF), or a growing sense of dread (see “Queen of the Kanguellas,” winner of the 2010 Readers Choice Award from Realms of Fantasy).  The demands of my day job don’t allow me much time for writing— I’m President of Columbia College— but that means when I do write, I want to create something highly polished.  I consider myself very much a student of writing rather than a teacher, though I have taught fantasy and science fiction writing before. I’m a voting member of the Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America, and I’ve had the good fortune to get to know some truly great authors
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Distinguised literary author, Marlene Lee, tries her hand at Show not Tell

 

Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha!

“Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha!” said Joni, laughing loudly enough to be heard by the woman and man sitting on a sofa at the far end of the room. “Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha!”  The child smiled broadly so that, when she stopped laughing, they would still notice how happy she was.

Twenty or more children stood in rows on a raised platform at the east end of a long room.  When the front row had undergone adequate scrutiny, as indicated by nods from the woman and man on the sofa, three teachers stepped up onto the stage and directed the children in the front row to return to the back while the second row stepped forward. Wave upon wave, the rows of children rhythmically replaced themselves.

Continue reading Distinguised literary author, Marlene Lee, tries her hand at Show not Tell