Sustaining Mood with our Sept Speaker: Scott Dalrymple

Sustaining Mood via Fantasy & Science Fiction

Scott pic outside (1)Join us for a stimulating afternoon
Sunday, Sept 13th, 2:00 pm at Unity Center

I enjoy stories that sustain a certain mood; fantasy and science fiction allow the exploration of some particularly interesting moods. I tend to craft and revise sentences until the sound, and the mood, are just right.  I often choose words simply because they have the right mouth-feel.  I care about the cadence of sentences, often down to the exact number of syllables.  It’s not at all scientific; it’s about what sounds right to me.  This technique can be used to create a humorous mood (see “An Open Letter to Earth,” which appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction), a creepy one (see “Enfant Terrible,” also in F&SF), or a growing sense of dread (see “Queen of the Kanguellas,” winner of the 2010 Readers Choice Award from Realms of Fantasy).  The demands of my day job don’t allow me much time for writing— I’m President of Columbia College— but that means when I do write, I want to create something highly polished.  I consider myself very much a student of writing rather than a teacher, though I have taught fantasy and science fiction writing before. I’m a voting member of the Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America, and I’ve had the good fortune to get to know some truly great authors

CCMWG Audit 2015

Dear Members of the Columbia Chapter of the Mo Writers Guild:
We are happy to announce that we just held an audit of our financial situation and the recommendations are included here.   The Board will take the recommendations given by Bob Ackermann into account as we meet in the near future.   As well, Suzanne our treasurer has made a proposed budget that we can work from and make decisions as we go into the new year of 2015 and beyond.
Lori Younker
2015 CCMWG President

CCMWG 2014 Audit Notes

Distinguised literary author, Marlene Lee, tries her hand at Show not Tell

 

Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha!

“Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha!” said Joni, laughing loudly enough to be heard by the woman and man sitting on a sofa at the far end of the room. “Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha!”  The child smiled broadly so that, when she stopped laughing, they would still notice how happy she was.

Twenty or more children stood in rows on a raised platform at the east end of a long room.  When the front row had undergone adequate scrutiny, as indicated by nods from the woman and man on the sofa, three teachers stepped up onto the stage and directed the children in the front row to return to the back while the second row stepped forward. Wave upon wave, the rows of children rhythmically replaced themselves.

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Emerging author Frank Montagnino delights us with his version of Show and Tell

“If Momma ain’t happy….”

(A really short story by Frank Montagnino)

It was a bleak day; a gray day, the kind of day that if you didn’t have to go to work you’d just pull up the covers and stay in bed.   But you wouldn’t enjoy that either, Joni thought.

She looked out the grimy window of her dreary room at the barren harvested field beyond the motel’s parking lot.  “Empty,” she  muttered to herself.  As empty as her life since Roger had pulled up stakes and left her all alone on the outskirts of this Godforsaken,  down-at-the-heels farm town.

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Urban Fantasy Author, Liz Schulte gives an example of “Show not Tell”

Urban Fantasy Author, Liz Schulte is our first entry in our “Show not Tell” Challenge.  What was the challenge?  Show this:  “Joanie/Joni is really sad.”

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The curtains were pulled tight and the wood blinds closed. There was still too much light. Joanie’s feet shuffled across the bedroom floor pushing cold, wet tissues out of the way. With a sniffle, she wiped beneath her nose and knocked away another errant tear with the back of her hand—there seemed to be no end to them. No matter what she did, she couldn’t piece herself back together.

She sank into bed, pulling the plush, warm cover over her head. Finally it was dark enough to remember or forget, but she hadn’t made up her mind which one she’d do yet. Both choices were equally devastating. A shaky breath escaped her tight chest as a new round of tears spilled down her cheeks. 

 She wasn’t just bent, she was broken.